posted 1 day agoApr 19, 2014, 10:27 pm with 472,793 notes

orchid-ink:

iraffiruse:

Satisfying things

being a human is so weird

posted 1 day agoApr 19, 2014, 10:26 pm with 27,958 notes

Marvel Sequels: No One Ever Gets a Haircut

(Source: xavierstea)

posted 1 day agoApr 19, 2014, 10:23 pm with 32,563 notes
dizzydicks:

omgbuglen:

An inflatable lawn tent. Imagine laying in this while it’s raining.

but imagine, you are sitting all alone in this thing with a cat or something, and suddenly a bomb comes and the world is literally destroyed. But for some reason, your bubble isn’t. So then radioactive zombies and stuff and it’s just a cat, you, and your bubble against a million zombies.

dizzydicks:

omgbuglen:

An inflatable lawn tent. Imagine laying in this while it’s raining.

but imagine, you are sitting all alone in this thing with a cat or something, and suddenly a bomb comes and the world is literally destroyed. But for some reason, your bubble isn’t. So then radioactive zombies and stuff and it’s just a cat, you, and your bubble against a million zombies.

posted 2 days agoApr 18, 2014, 11:00 pm with 2,330 notes

red-hana:

RinHaru - gift for sweet Alex!

posted 2 days agoApr 18, 2014, 10:59 pm with 728 notes

wickedclothes:

Glowing Potion Necklace

Glowing blue liquid is held inside of this small glass bottle. The bottle is accompanied by an ornate, gold-colored, metal filigree pendant, which is attached to the front. Hung on a 21” brass chain. Sold on Etsy.

posted 2 days agoApr 18, 2014, 10:59 pm with 1,552 notes
shingeki-no-kyojjn:

進撃ログ6(腐) by 夕城
posted 2 days agoApr 18, 2014, 10:58 pm with 21,680 notes
posted 2 days agoApr 18, 2014, 10:55 pm with 1,464 notes
wickedclothes:

Wicked Clothes presents our latest item: the ‘Don’t Lose Sleep’ Sweater!
Lions don’t lose sleep over the opinions of sheep.
Lions also get to use coupon code ‘SHIPFREE’ to get free shipping on all domestic orders! Buy one now!

wickedclothes:

Wicked Clothes presents our latest item: the ‘Don’t Lose Sleep’ Sweater!

Lions don’t lose sleep over the opinions of sheep.

Lions also get to use coupon code ‘SHIPFREE’ to get free shipping on all domestic orders! Buy one now!

posted 3 days agoApr 17, 2014, 2:54 pm with 30,911 notes

(Source: sansalayned)

posted 3 days agoApr 17, 2014, 2:53 pm with 694 notes

rivialle-heichou:

image

image

まっ黒@壁博2 ツ49b

translated by me

T/N: I really wouldn’t call this doujin NSFW…it was actually really sweet in almost a bitter sweet sense…

Read More

posted 3 days agoApr 17, 2014, 2:53 pm with 21,391 notes

(Source: starlorrd)

posted 3 days agoApr 17, 2014, 2:51 pm with 654 notes
posted 3 days agoApr 17, 2014, 2:50 pm with 6,026 notes
And here is the most important thing I’ve learned from 10 years in this world: fandom is about people. It is not about a tv show or a ship, it’s not about a character or a creator or about that one fanfic that changed the way you regard fanfic as a whole. Fandom is about finding people who love what you love. It’s about finding someone in Israel who has the same reaction to Milo Ventimiglia’s bottom lip, or someone in Singapore who will share in your Downton Abbey geekery, or someone in Michigan who knows what you mean when you can’t express your emotions beyond “!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.” And who will then ask you about your day, or send you a link they know will make you laugh, or recommend something else (a tv show, band, podcast, book, youtube video) they know you’re going to love. Because they know you.
- Elizabeth  (via matsuohka)

(Source: fnchs)

posted 3 days agoApr 17, 2014, 2:49 pm with 1,817 notes

skylanth:

There was a little loose wire on it that every time it lit up, was just sending an electric current into my body, so if I seem shocked in the movie, that’s why.

probably my favorite movie-making story.

(Source: geiszlerian)

posted 3 days agoApr 17, 2014, 2:48 pm with 4,965 notes
theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]